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weapons of the nato alliance, like this air strike by britain. and yet, u.s. military officials concede today that the libyan regime is still determined to fight and reinforced its positions in the eastern cities fwh including ajdabiya. the occasion says gadhafi is trying to recruit and arm volunteers to fight rebel forces. the libyan strongman defiant as nato moves to take over command of the libyan mission. the top u.s. commander of the operation tells me that nato has now agreed in principle to not only take charge of the no-fully zone but to also to protect libyan civilians as well. the details will be worked out, he says, over the next few erda. general carter ham sending a message directly to gadhafi. here in "the situation room," we spoke just a littlewhilego and i had this exchange with him. cnn is seen live around the world, including in libya. and officer your military-to-military -- the officers surrounding gadhafi might be watching right now, gadhafi might be watching, his sons might be watching. look into atthe camera. what would you say to them right now, officer t officer
will explain to those lawmakers and to the american people his take on the u.s. military involve in the the north african nation, which began just over a week ago. white house correspondent mike emanuel is at the national defense university, the site of the speech tonight with a preview. mike? >> reporter: good evening. president obama will speak to a mostly military audience in the auditorium about why he authorized military force in libya. and where the mission goes from here. military intervention by the u.s. and allies appeared to have shifted momentum in favor of the rebels who fought their way to muammar gaddafi's hometown of sirte. >> clearly, the opposition is not well-organized and it's not a very robust organization. that is obvious. so any gain that they make is tenuous based on that. >> reporter: in a town hall on univision simulcast in spanish, president obama reiterated about libya. >> our involvement is there is going to be limited. both in time and in scope. >> reporter: over the weekend, mr. obama explained why he believed military action was necessary. >> i firm
evening. i'm bret baier. pentagon officials say so far the u.s. spent $580 million on the libyan conflict. while we're committed to the operation financially, militarily and diplomatically, questions remain about what it will mean to deem the mission a success. james rosen is at the state department. good evening. >> reporter: good evening. president obama and top commanderrers pushed forward on the parallel and separate path to strip muammar gaddafi of his ability to wage war and pressuring him to resign. today a top nato commander said the missions may connect over time in london, secretary of state hillary clinton met with colleagues from the united nations, europe and arab league to sketch out end game in libya. clinton said arming the libyan rebels were not discussed and only vaguely did she address growing speculation that gaddafi will receive asylum. >> we believe he must go. we're working with the international community to try to achieve that outcome. and look for political resolution which could include leaving the country. >> bret: we are not engaged and look for him to go does
with u.s. ambassador to the u.n., susan rice. >> brown: then, we get the latest on the radiation containment efforts in japan as the government there raises the alert level. >> suarez: plus jeffrey kaye, in beijing, has chinese reaction to the japanese nuclear crisis. >> the nation is in the process of building 37 new nuclear pourpts, and is now reexamining safety. >> brown: mark shields and david brooks provide their weekly analysis. >> suarez: and fred de sam lazaro gets a rare look inside syria, where the government is just beginning to be challenged by protesters. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> okay, listen. somebody has got to get serious. >> i think... >> we need renewable energy. >> ...renewable energy is vital to our planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's going to work an a big scale. only, i think it's going to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technolo
new york, good night, america. >> chris: two major defections from the libyan regime as the u.s. begins covert operations on the ground. day closer to a government shutdown. there are still big roadblocks to a deal. the interstate fight over the 2012 presidential primaries. live from the studio in washington, this is "special report." good evening, i'm chris wallace in for bret baier. another high-ranking libyan official has defected from muammar gaddafi's regime, making two in as many days. a european diplomat describes it as rats fleeing from a sinking ship. defense secretary gates says there won't be american boots on the ground, despite president obama's authorization of covert cia operations. the allied coalition is wiped out estimateed 25% of gaddafi's forces. rebels are still losing ground. forcing lawmakers on capitol hill to ask what is next? white house correspondent mike emanuel is tracking the story. mike? >> reporter: good evening. senior white house officials are pleased, control of the air operation over libya was transferred today from the u.s. to nato. now there
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
. they will not be successful doing so. >>> u.s. soldier jeremy morelock has pleaded guilty to charges he and other soldiers killed afghan citizens for sport last year. but morelock's possible life sentence was reduced to 24 years in a plea deal. german news magazines have published photographs showing morelock and other soldiers posing over the bodies of dead afghans. >>> allied attacks on tripoli are continuing into a sixth day. take a look at these pictures. they're from libyan state tv, and they reportedly show the destruction at a military base in tripoli. look at that fire raging. these were apparently filmed just after a coalition air strike. the coalition attacks on military targets have now grounded gadhafi's air force and crippled the country's air defenses. so strikes from now on are focusing more on ground troops as they move toward rebel-held towns to try and recapture them. >>> the libyan government says a number of civilians have been killed by coalition air strikes including women and children. to prove it, they bundled foreign reporter on it a convoy of buses to show them a house they said
stated that it is u.s. policy that gadhafi needs to go. we have a wide range of tools in addition to our military efforts to support that policy. >> the american people from the congress need to hear what our president believes his objectives are. if we are going into a war with libya, we should declare a war on libya. we should pull together with our allies and try to figure out a plan of how that war is to be won. these are things that must be debated here in washington apart from paris or at least encounters with other countries in which we say we'll hold your coat. we don't object to what you are up to. >>> good morning. welcome to morning joe. beautiful shot. times square. beautiful because i'm not there. i'm in dallas. mika is in the south of france trying to gather a feeling of the people in that beautiful part of the country. a story breaking suggesting that america, the united kingdom upset with the french leadership for overreaching. we are going to talk to mike barnicle about that. visiting professor, harlds ford junior and the great willie geist. pat buchanan and the host of
, david applegate of the u.s. geological survey will discuss the threat of earthquakes and other july 6 -- your logic hazards. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2011] host: good morning, friday, march 18. we will open up the phone lines for your comments today on the story that is most important to you. we will put the phone numbers on the screen right away. unfolding news about the u.n. security council and possible air strikes against libya, and continuing crises in japan and the budget story at home. the most significant new was story. we will go to your phone calls right away to hear what is most important to you in a week of unfolding big issues. we will go to the newspapers as we are waiting for your calls. as you can see, britain, france, and the united states are lined up for air strike against coffee -- gaddafi. it suggests in the newspapers the airplanes may well immediately. "the chicago tribune" tells us american officials expect the united states would do the heavy lifting in a campaign that may includ
the transition from u.s. command has been seemless, but there are still serious questions about the u.s. involvement moving forward, what to do about the rebels, of course, reports of the cia, on the ground. this as lawmakers remain divided over our role there. >> they are clearly in violation of the act that sets three and only three conditions under which the president can commit armed forces. one them is declaration war, authorization of congress, there's been none and three is a national emergency caused by an attack on united states territories, possessions or armed forces. there has been none. so this is clearly illegal. martha: there has been so much discussion over getting approval from congress for what is going on on the ground in libya, and right now we are watching some unfolding testimony in front of the house armed services committee, secretary of defense robert gates, and also we want to play for you a comment moments ago from the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, admiral mike mullen. let's listen to what he had to say: >> we have continued to strike at qaddafi's mil
, living in an economy where there is a u.s. and in the u.s.s.r., what is the role in this adulation? who has access to arms and weapons? for example, what is going on in mexico right now with the house world arms trade? host: we're talking with all of you today. you can call in about your thoughts on the 30th anniversary of the reagan assassination attempt, or you can send as a tweak on twitter. there are the addresses. we are also asking the question on our facebook page. if you want, you can continue that conversation on that side as well. montana on the republican line. caller: i am a republican. host: and you are on the air. caller: high among the republican committee of great falls, montana. i am a republican. hello? host: you have to turn your television down. that is why we're having confusion here. an independent scholar, that morning. caller: i am 27 years old, so i was born about that time. but i went for social studies of that nature. there was a lot of racial disparity, well our clients and all day, to make the majority of white folks look get blacks as lazy, did not want to
upper level winds that actually transport that into parts of kansas, the u.s., and many other places. and before all is said and done, i would not be surprised if you could find trace amounts of this all the way over to europe. but i have to tell you, this is very, very harmless. this is not a big deal. if you're walking out to your car in bright sunlight, chances are you might be exposed to more radiation than that than these particles across the globe. >> it does still, of course, make you think twice when you hear about it. but hearing it's harmless is good. >>> in a few minutes, we'll be talking more about all of this with a disaster expert about containment efforts in japan. he led numerous expeditions into some of the most contaminated areas of chernobyl. >>> to libya now, and rebels getting closer to moammar gadhafi's doorstep gaining ground with new coalition air strikes. nato now says it will take over the entire military mission there, not just the no-fly zone. so far the u.s. has supplied nearly all the fire power according to pentagon figures. the u.s. military has launch
of america has done what we said we would do. >> ok. so last night, he was talking about my leadership. u.s. led. go back 10 days ago, we didn't hear that. listen to this montage. >> in this effort, the united states is prepared to act as part of an international coalition. american leadership is essential. but that does not mean acting alone. in this effort, the united states is acting with a broad coalition. make no mistake, today we are part of a broad coalition. our goal is focused. our cause is just. and our coalition is strong. >> well, so that's the president as he evolved into this position and i think one of the many columnists who looked to the speech and analyzed the speech and said it best, this is a good speech if he said it 11 days ago, he would have quieted 95% of the critics. i would have found a way to give the secretary of state some credit. >> no kidding. she got him into this thing. >> it's amazing how much stuff you can do if you don't mind who gets the credit. that would have been a perfect time with hillary clinton leading -- secretary of state hillary clinton leadi
>>> a lot happening around the world right here at home, as well. let's get you caught up. the u.s. and its allies pounding libya for a third day. 120 cruise missiles and counting. is this going to help keep moammar gadhafi from attacking his own people? >>> smoke rising from a reactor. workers evacuated. and now there are new concerns about radiation in the food supply. >>> and here at home, a major cell phone merger. the number two carrier poised to become number one. what this means to you. let's get started. "american morning" begins right now. >>> good morning, everybody. >> it's monday, march 21st. >> it's great to see all of you this morning. we're following two stories again, but major developments from where we left off on friday. >> breaking news from japan. >> smoke spotted coming from a damaged nuclear reactor. engineers are struggling there to prevent a meltdown after a devastating earthquake and tsunami earlier this month. let's get to anna coren. i understand it's now been evacuated. what's going on there? >> reporter: that's exactly right, ali. they thought they wer
outside the reactor. so high that top u.s. environmental officials report that a single dose is enough to cause hemorrhaging. more from osaka, japan. >> reporter: yes, megyn. it is looking serious now in terms of the quantity of radiation emanating from the nuclear plant. it appears that we have significant problems at reactor 2 and reactor 3. hearing there are pools of water in a trench that drains off from the reactor towards the sea. it's about 90 feet from the sea, we believe. and that's perhaps one of the reasons that we're seeing greater contamination off the shore. the information is not entirely cleaand that is because they're not sure exactly where the leak is coming from. the greatest concern is that it's coming from the container vessel, indicating, indeed, that there is a partial meltdown. the meltdown may be temporary, that hopefully they will be able to fill that container area up and keep the rods cool. because the radiation levels are so high, it's difficult for the workers to get in there. if they're able to go in without getting radiation burns, it limits what they ca
now entered it's second week. why the u.s. is now trying to take a back seat in the operation. >>> one maryland county is trying to put more room between protesters and funerals, how they plan to do it. >>> the fbi says she stuffed nearly $80,000 in cash into her underwear, i'm kelly mcpherson, coming up on eyewitness news, we'll detail additional charges for ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, >>> welcome back to eyewitness news saturday morning. i'm gigi barnett. >>> i'm tim williams. it is around 30 degrees at bwi, marshal in baltimore a degree or so warmer. it will not be a very warm day overall. the sky is brightening. we have clouds but the sun is peaking through the horizon. we have a good bit of cloud cover right now. that is ahead of a storm system that is moving in. it will be passing on our south side over the next 12 hours or so. we will start to see the potential for snow showers that we'll talk about in a moment. for today 46 degrees, chilly with times of clouds and sun. 30 degrees, mostly cloudy with a little snow late. we're talking after midnight. your day's events today we'll be oka
to libya, gene cretz talking to the opposition chief. >> >> a u.s. officials confirmed the authenticity of the call, but would not comment on the query about weapons. hillary clinton is speaking to the opposition, too. >> we are reaching out to the opposition inside and outside of libya. i will be meeting with some of those figures both here in the united states and when i travel next week to discuss what more the united states and others can do. >> reporter: but moammar gadhafi and is spokesman's son show no signs of caving into pressure. >> the libyan peet will never, ever welcome nato, will never, ever welcome americans here. libya is not a piece of cake. we are n-- >> this is a kind of stalemate back and forth, but i think longer term, that the regime will prevail. >> jill dougherty reporting for us from the state department. we'll have a lot more on what general clapper, head of the national -- director of national intelligence had to say. this note, though, i have been invited to travel with secretary clinton on her overseas trip next week. i'll be reporting on critical talks abou
john mccain wants the u.s. and others to arm the rebels. he says the president needs to clarify the purpose, the costs and duration of the operation. >> this policy has been characterized by confusion and indecision and delay. it is no wonder that americans are confused as to what our policy is. on the one hand, they say it is humanitarian and the other hand they say gadhafi must go. >> president obama will speak on the libyan mission tonight. he will speak from the national defense university in washington. we get started at 7:00 p.m. eastern. 4:00 out west. >>> in london, british prime minister david cameron is making a statement on the libyan opposition. he is organizing for a transition process. a conference will be held in london tomorrow. it is designed to outline the political framework for the way ahead in libya. >>> now the syrian government may bow to protesters and demands analyst the emergency law that has been in place for 50 years now. the president is expected to address the nation soon and dozens of protesters have been killed since demonstrations began just nine
in on our own. we should be going in under the u.n., not the u.s. flag. we shouldn't attack a country this didn't attack us first and shouldn't have boots on the ground. from that mouth, this is sort of the perfect way to go. we go in not under the u.s. flag but under the u.n. flag. we go in on the humanitarian mission, short-term limited thing, no boots on the ground. i think that going in, he did it the right way. my big question is how long are we going to be there? what really is our mission? i think the -- it is really, really fuzzy whether it is just to protect the rebels or to get gadhafi out. we are saying both things. how much is it going to cost? it depends on how soon we get out. if we could turn this over to the french government or to somebody else, as they say they are going to, in a couple of days, get out of there, then i think this is going to be a successful operation. if it drags on and gadhafi stays in power, it is another loser. >> pat buchanan, what are the odds if we are being realistic we will be out as the president had said in a mere matter of days, turning i
all of this is. on the heels of a nuclear prices in japan, south carolina here in the u.s. went to court demanding that the nuclear regulatory commission provide a permanent place to store america's waste. there are 104 operating reactors, they're scattered across 65 plants in 31 different states. if you take a look at this map, this gives you a better idea of exactly where this 63 thousand tons of spent fuel, the darker the color of the state, the more radioactive waste that state has, according to the nrc. again, we're talking about 63,000 tons of spent fuel. if you take a look, with the telestrator working, illinois is the state with most, 776 tons. coming in second place is pennsylvania. as we know, pennsylvania, the site of three mile island, the nuclear site that had zadisaste back in the late '80s. and 3,700 tons of spent fuel. pretty much a tie with north carolina and south carolina here. let me show you a map quickly that illustrates what we're talking about when we say spent fuel. these are the spent fuel pools. they're steel-lined concrete pools filled with water like
gadhafi's hometown. president obama prepares to explain his decision to involve the u.s. military in libya during an address to the nation tonight. >>> in a disturbing case, the 55 billionaire air to the s.c. johnson fortune charged with sexually abusing a child for years. the alleged victim, his now 15-year-old stepdaughter. >>> and princely party. harry threw his brother a bachelor party over the weekend but a hitch in the plans forced a last-minute change. we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal we'll have details and tell you about our plans for the royal wedding today, march 28, 2011. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good morning. welcome to "today" on a monday morning. i'm matt lauer. >> i'm meredith vieira. nice to be back. >> it's been a while. >> it has. i went to london to vicsit the queen. she wouldn't answer the door though. but president obama is going to face criticism. membe members of both parties have expressed concerns about the goal of the mission and how long our forces will be in libya. we'll have more straight ahead. >> also, did
very much. a week into the campaign the u.s. role in libya is about to change. nato will take over enforcement of the no-fly zone but rebels and pro-gadhafi forces are fighting it out street to street. nbc's richard engel is one of the first journalists to reach ajdabiya where there are battles raging now. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. rebels have taken about half of this city. gadhafi's forces still contain pockets and have tanked positioned around the edges. we have seen street-to-street fighting. we can hear gunfire now. rebels have been taking cover, firing machine guns, trying to find gadhafi's forces and drive them out. this is what the war in libya has become. the western air strikes will take out gadhafi's heavy weapons, tanks, aircraft and allow the rebels to push into cities themselves and fight it out almost hand to hand with gadhafi's forces in several cities in libya. >> you talk hand to hand. i was struck on thursday by your reporting and how poorly equipped the rebels seemed to be in terms of weapons. are you sai seeing indications that they are being supp
need the assistance of the u.s. and coalition forces in order to push back the advances of the libyan government troops, in particular when they were making the major advancement on benghazi, which officials here said would have cost the lives of tens of thousands of innocent civilians. will they need to be armed now in order to push gadhafi out? well, the president yesterday in one of those sit-down interviews again saying they're not ruling anything out or ruling anything in, but he said that question is being assessed. take a listen. >> one of the questions that we want to answer is, do we start getting to a stage where gadhafi's forces are sufficiently degraded where it may not be necessary to arm opposition groups, but we're not taking anything off the table at this point. >> reporter: now, aides here at the white house seem to feel that it there is progress being made there because of the pressure that's being applied in this phase two of the operation there, which is now being led by nato, brooke. >> because of the pressure being we know time is of the essence. so how long woul
. in the u.s., they're not concerned so they lobby in a different direction. >> thank you. i will ask one more question. this is my second round. if you fast forward to today and look at the other end of the buchan, march 4, 2011, problems we have now, the chair has described moral hazard and the like. we talked about that. what did you do? i can anticipate your answers as i think you've given them, just to make it very clear on the record, what would you recommend march 4, 2011? >> briefly, first, i want to emphasize the things we have said. one, you need more capital. and that you need increasing capital has to be with the size of the bank's, the risk of too big to fail. it has to be that this distortion has to be eliminated. secondly, if you have a problem, you should play by the ordinary rules of capitalism. when you go into bankruptcy, you convert that to equity. it is really a version of the standard rules of capitalism. you look at the numbers back in citibank, they had enough long- term capital it was more than enough to manage them, more than we put in. the answer -- the resoluti
president william millar. frank gaffney talks about the u.s. response to the civil war in libya. and a look at the problem of bullying in schools with francisco negron of the national school board association. >> video this morning courtesy of al-jazeera. this is the nuclear reactor in japan. according to the associated press, an explosion there destroyed a building housing the reactor. and also there are fears that it could melt down after being hit by the earthquake and tsunami there in japan. again, those reports saying that large amounts of radiation were coming out in the evacuation around the plant expanded. but officials didn't know how dangerous at this time the leak was to people. again that courtesy there from al-jazeera this morning of the plant. now, in related use, there are also reports this morning as far as those who are affected, 1,300 dead, 2,000 people in emergency shelters. as you see there, people waiting on top of buildings to be rescued by various means this morning. this courtesy of n.h.k. and also there and 50,000 emergency crews. we registered in findin
life. for a woman in any country, in the u.s., egypt, libya, to come out and say she was raped. no one would do that unless they were raped especially in a conservative society. human rights watch have said girls and women who are survivors of rape are taken to because of the shame associated with rape. and these are centers where the girls and women are held as prisoners basically because -- >> they're not rehabilitated. >> social rehabilitation centers. >> held away from the rest of society. >> they're practically prisoners. >> that's the part that's most amazing. you've told you that sources say she's being held still even though they claim she's been set free. >> her mother and relatives have appeared on television and said that libyan officials have told them if she retracts the story, they'll release her. but gives me hope she's alive. but i won't believe she's alive until i see her. i was a journalist in libya, i went with a group of journalists in 1996, and they kept us in a hotel practically prisoners of gadha gadhafi's ministry of information. and during a news conference bec
of the u.s. debate in part of the transfers to the transitional council? >> we haven't made a decision about arming the rebels or arms transfers, so there has not been any need to discuss that at this point. we did discuss nonlethal assistance and discussed ways of trying to enable the transition national council to meet a lot of their financial needs and how we could do that through the international community, given the challenges that sanctions pose, but recognizing they obviously are going to need funds to keep themselves going. we discussed a broad range of matters and certainly their presentation, which some of you may have seen earlier today as to what kind of civil society and political structure they are trying to build until libya, are exactly in line with what they have consistently said were their goals, their commitment to democracy and to a very robust engagement with people from across the spectrum of libyans is, i think, appropriate. we do not have any specific information about specific individuals from any organization who are part of this, but, of course, we are gett
that the majority of the u.s. segment was brought up a piece by piece. it will be truly amazing. >> congratulations on a successful mission. the question will be for someone who wants to tackle it. i do not think people on the ground can appreciate what the living spaces are like in the space station. now that it is complete can you talk a little bit about how large it is and how much space you had to move around in? >> just to start off, this space station is the largest pressurized volume in place in history -- in space in the history. i use the word that my son uses, which isginormous -- is g inormous. it is equivalent to a seventh 47 or bigger. it is oppressive -- a 747 or better. we can use every single one of the walls or models in a way that we cannot do on the ground. it makes for a wonderful resource for science and living and being up here floating around. it is great. >> i have a question about garbage, literally. how much trash does the iss generate? where do you put it and do you recycle? >> we do recycle certain things. we recycle our water and -- our urine and turned it into water. t
tomorrow. .. with u.s. comptroller general jean dodaro. it pinpointed 34 areas from defense and job training to social services and safety for federal agencies have redundant programs. this is two hours and ten minutes. >> good morning. the committee meeting will come to order. >> as is the new tradition of this committee, we will begin by reading the oversight mission statement. we exist to secure to fundamental principles. first, americans have a right to know their money washington spends and takes is well spent and second, americans deserve an efficient, effective government that works for them. our duty on the oversight and government reform committee is to protect these rights. our solemn responsibility is to hold government accountable to tax payers because taxpayers have a right to know what they get from their government. we will work tigers tirelessly with citizen watchdogs to deliver the facts to the american people and bring genuine reform to the federal bureaucracy. this is the mission of the oversight and government reform committee to read today's hearing is the secon
's at the greatest risk. it's their immigration problem rather more than the uk. maybe the u.s. and uk would play a part. i think people who advocate armed humanitarian intervention need to think quite widely about the kind of coalition that would be put together. >> yes, you had a question in the back. >> i'm maria, i'm a postgraduate student at the african studies. i've been very much following what's been happening in the past month, being from the middle east myself as well, and of course, it's very interesting. and my question is on something that i've been thinking about is the definition of how al-jazeera is defining the professionalism, so to say. the western ethics of journalism, and i put western between two quotations. i wanted to know your upon about how al-jazeera is kind of playing with the idea of distance, the emotional distance. it's not like any other channel. when you watch specific, you can use egypt and libya and tunisia, and i you feel like you are part of the news. al-jazeera has redefined the concept of coverage in the last events. and the other question is what do you thi
for investment from u.s.. i think finally you will get a kick out of the one mccain and i were on. we met with a crew of the leaders of the uprising and one of them said to us, senators, we want to ask if you can help us to get one american who we would most like to come and speak to us here and i thought to myself who is this going to be. and the answer, mark zuckerburg. [laughter] welcome because -- because they felt in some sense, first he represented the new world of telecommunications but that in some sense he had provided or facebook provided them with what we might call the weapons in their peaceful revolution. >> very remarkable. i'm very hopeful. >> i can't think the two of you enough for what you've done in my testimony. it's very helpful, very specifically helpful to focus our review that will go on for the rest of this year. we are going to keep the record of and for 15 days for additional questions and statements. thank you again very much. the hearing is adjourned. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations]รท?oy,
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